Our Team

Our team usually consists of approximately 10 editors and 4 lead editors. Editors work in groups and are usually assigned to at least two papers. Without knowing who the author is, they go through three rounds of providing feedback. Lead editors are those that are primarily in charge of organizing the feedback rounds for one paper and they change every edition. The ESJP also needs one editor to be in charge of all operations, the Editor-in-Chief, and one Secretary.

Editor-in-Chief

Georgina Aránzazu Dijkstra

What does working at ESJP mean to you?
Being a part of the ESJP is an extraordinary opportunity to work together alongside motivated and inspiring students, as well as finding a free space for your own intellectual curiosity to flourish. It is both exceptionally meaningful, and fun!

What’s your editing philosophy?
As an editor, you try to immerse yourself within the complex philosophical ideas of the author in order to first understand them. Once this has been accomplished, your role is to make these ideas come across as clear and understandable as possible. This is where my editing philosophy comes into play: you want  to ensure the ideas of the author are expressed as clearly as possible, because you want  readers to enjoy them as much as you did. This way, you honor both the author, and the reader.

How would you convince a friend to join ESJP?
Working for the ESJP is wonderful for a variety of different reasons. It teaches you how the publication process works, what defines a high quality philosophical paper, and exposes you to new ideas you wouldn’t probably have considered within your normal studies. Apart from the intellectual aspect, it is an incredibly enjoyable social environment as well. You work in a team full of interesting students who share your passion, and at the end of the day and every publication, you feel as if you have contributed something meaningful to the field of philosophy we all care so deeply about.

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Secretary

Jeroen de Vries

What does working at ESJP mean to you?
Working at the ESJP is a great way to become more engaged with philosophical matters and debates, as well as getting to know many enthusiastic, ambitious, and philosophically inclined people. Together, this boils down to a lot of contact with a lot of very fun people, about matters that are already fascinating in themselves. 

What’s your editing philosophy?
“It is hardly conceivable that mutual understanding and further progress are possible without an accurate localisation of the sources of differences in opinion” (Tinbergen, 1936).
Writing is difficult; writing to be understood by others even more so. However, being able to express oneself clearly and specifically is the best approach to getting one’s point across. More importantly, it is the most effective and genuine way to have one’s ideas considered, criticized, and improved upon by others.

How would you convince a friend to join ESJP?
I would emphasize the scholarly benefits that come with editing for the ESJP: not only does it offer valuable lessons about both constructive reading and constructive writing, but it also gives insight into the ins and outs of the publishing process itself, which can be tremendously helpful when trying to have one’s own work published. 

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Editors

Lara Rose Eikamp

What does working at ESJP mean to you?
I love reading complicated texts and originally fell in love with the editing process while writing fiction. The ESJP however gives me the opportunity to work with academic texts, which is different but still exciting!

What’s your editing philosophy?
I like to meet the author where they’re at. Finding the compromise between the author’s vision and what potential readers will be able to enjoy can be a fascinating adventure. I’d like to think that good communication, a structured approach, and a sprinkling of author autonomy make for a good editing process.

How would you convince a friend to join ESJP?

I suppose I would ask them whether they are in need of a challenge. Perhaps they’ve been feeling like they’re just going through the motions when reading their academic literature recently.

Being responsible for the editing of a paper helps approach each paper with fresh eyes.

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Gideon Frey

What does working at ESJP mean to you?
Working on the ESJP is incredibly enriching. Not only do you get to read and interact with so many interesting philosophy texts but you get to engage with and help refine ideas with a group of great editors and you can really see a text grow and become better and better over time.

What’s your editing philosophy?
I try to ask myself what I as a reader would appreciate. In philosophy it is often too easy to get caught in your own thoughts and that makes it hard to communicate the ideas. A good editing process can make a rough diamond shine and bring out the brilliant ideas that are already present.

How would you convince a friend to join ESJP?
I would say how much fun it is to see a text grow and change over time and how much they can learn about their own writing and philosophizing.

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Luc Lichtsteiner
 

What does working at ESJP mean to you?
Working with the ESJP community has already been mentioned, but it can’t be emphasized enough. The people here are well read and have very diverse interests; I’ve learned a lot in every discussion I’ve had at the ESJP. Besides, that makes the editing process absolutely gripping because everyone has valuable insights at each and every step of the editing process. But that also makes it disorienting sometimes: there is always someone who knows a subject like the back of their hand!

What’s your editing philosophy?

We are a bunch of students trying to help each other write excellent academic pieces. In a way, it’s an intellectual journey for both the editors and the author. All of us are engaged in a conversation (although a blind one!) to bring a piece of writing to the next level. On our side, I’d say our goal is to perceive as clearly as possible all the value present in the text and see how we can exacerbate it. We try to understand how to make the ideas crystal clear, the writing accessible, and much more. Based on that, we discuss with the author how our suggestions can be incorporated in the text.


How would you convince a friend to join ESJP?
Besides the awesome community, working at the ESJP is an experience. It’s a great way to engage with others’ ideas, understand their value and see how they can best be articulated. It’s intellectually valuable for others as well as for oneself. Any thinker can gain a lot from it!

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Arwen Vonck

What does working at ESJP mean to you?
Working at ESJP is a very valuable experience that allows me to engage with philosophical literature in an entirely new way. Not only is it very inspiring to be able to read the works of my fellow students, as an editor I also have the opportunity to help elevate their texts to an even higher level. It is a very rewarding experience to help an author publish a text they are truly proud of.

What’s your editing philosophy?
What is important to me when editing is to work together with the author in an interactive interplay, because editing is not a top-down process. Therefore, I believe that it is important to converse with the author and to help them formulate their ideas in a clear and engaging manner, so that their text can reach the audience it deserves.

How would you convince a friend to join ESJP?
Although editing texts can be challenging at times, it is a very valuable experience to become familiar with the process of editing in such a friendly environment. I also find that learning to look at a text through the eyes of an editor helps improve your own writing skills. All in all, working at ESJP is a very fun and fulfilling experience that I would recommend to all my fellow students who have an affinity with writing.

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Giovanni Prins

What does working at ESJP mean to you?
Being able to work on the ESJP allows me to get into contact and interact with different authors, styles, and philosophical fields that I would normally not encounter. Therefore, it is an exciting opportunity to broaden my own horizon while also (hopefully) sharing some of my own experiences with the authors and my fellow editors. 

What’s your editing philosophy?
I’d like to think my editing philosophy is a good mix between bringing some helpful advice and experience to the table, while also making sure the paper does not lose its original authenticity. In the end, it is the author’s paper, and that needs to stay that way. I am only here to help them along.

How would you convince a friend to join ESJP?
All I would need to do is simply describe my own experience. The editing itself is a lot of fun. The interaction with the author (while anonymous) is very nice and it is satisfying to see the progress over time. The editing team is a lot of fun as well. You may not always agree with your team and vice versa, but that is exactly what creates a vibrant space in which good editorial work is done. At the end of the day you develop your own writing style, broaden your horizon, while also having a lot of fun!

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Ermanno Petrocchi

What does working at ESJP mean to you?
Working at ESJP means being part of a brilliant environment. Having to read and edit excellent articles is extremely thrilling and inspiring as writing styles and tastes differ between people but none is better than others. Furthermore, working together with other editors with different writing skills and different opinions on the various articles is very stimulating. For me, the ESJP represents a chance to enrich my experience and improve my academic skills.



What’s your editing philosophy?
While editing my aim is to preserve the originality of the article by trying to touch the text as little as possible. When the text is clear and well written, that's fine; when it is a bit unclear my goal is only to report it to the author and give them some possible suggestions on how to improve their piece. Therefore, my editing philosophy is to collaborate with the author in order to leave them the maximum freedom to modify their own article as they prefer.

How would you convince a friend to join ESJP?
This is a great experience! If a student wants to understand how the editing process works, there is no better experience than this one. Moreover, directly understanding the mechanisms of a journal and being an editor is not something a student can easily come across, there is no reason then to let this opportunity slip away!

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Kas Molenaar
 

What does working at ESJP mean to you?
The ESJP has been a very enjoyable way to work on more academic skills, in a very supportive and positive environment. A very welcome addition to my baccalaureate!

What’s your editing philosophy?

“The author has written this in this specific way for a reason.”

 

Of course, authors can be mistaken in spelling or grammar, but I’m convinced you should always try to understand what the author wanted to bring across; sometimes a slightly vague sentence or paragraph isn’t bad writing, but a way to help the reader get on the right track. Be careful with editing too harshly!


How would you convince a friend to join ESJP?
To be fair, people who would be interested in editing for the ESJP wouldn’t need much convincing; I would just assure them that the ESJP is a nice environment to work in.

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